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King Edward VI Academy
King Edward VI Academy@KEVIAcademy

Pupil Premium

 

A Guide to Pupil Premium

 

If your child is eligible for free school meals, their schools may also be entitled to receive a sum of money to boost their learning. This guide explains the allocation of the Pupil Premium for King Edward VI and its students.

 

What is the Pupil Premium?

 

Introduced in 2011, the Pupil Premium is a sum of money given to schools each year by the Government to improve the attainment of disadvantaged students.

This is based on research showing that students from low income families perform less well at school than their peers. Research showed that often, students who are entitled to Pupil Premium face challenges such as poor language and communication skills, less family support, lack of confidence and issues with attendance and punctuality compared to non-Pupil Premium students. The Pupil Premium is intended to directly benefit the students who are eligible, helping to narrow the gap between them and their classmates and their peers nationally.

 

Is your child eligible?

 

Schools are given a Pupil Premium for:

  • Students who have qualified for free school meals at any point in the past six years. The school receives [£935] for each of these students.
  • Students who have been looked after under local authority care for more than one day. These school is awarded a premium of [£2300].

 

How is it spent at King Edward VI Academy?

 

Schools can choose how to spend their Pupil Premium money, as they are best placed to identify what would be of most benefit to the students who are eligible.

Common ways in which schools spend their Pupil Premium fund include:

 

·        

Extra one-to-one or small-group support for students within the classroom.

·        

Employing extra teaching assistants to work with classes.

·        

Running catch-up sessions before or after school, for example for students who need extra help with particular skills.

·        

Providing extra tuition for able students who receive the Pupil Premium.

·        

Funding educational trips and visits.

 

 

At King Edward VI Academy, Pupil Premium money will be used to support the following areas identified as barriers to success for Pupil Premium students:

 

·        

Poor literacy levels on entry

·        

Students on entry with moderate learning difficulties without the support required to make at least expected progress.

·        

Some students have minimal support at home for learning.

·        

Students demonstrating unacceptable and challenging behaviour causing disruption to learning.

·        

Below average attendance for whole school in particular PP students.

·        

Matching a curriculum in a small school to the needs of individuals.

·        

Growing mental health issues having an impact on learning and the wellbeing of students.

·        

Ability to evidence providing impartial careers advice

All schools have to show that they are using their Pupil Premium fund appropriately. This is measured through Ofsted inspections and annual performance tables showing the progress made by students who are eligible for Pupil Premium. In [academy name] the Pupil Premium Plan 2018/19 (shown below), shows how much money has been allocated, how the academy intends to spend it, how the previous year’s allocation was spent and how it is making a difference to the attainment of disadvantaged students.

 

If your child qualifies for free school meals, it’s important that you tell us – even if they take a packed lunch – as this enables them to claim Pupil Premium.


 

1.  

Summary information

Academy

King Edward VI Academy

Academic Year

2018/19

Total PP budget received 18/19

Total Planned PP spend 18/19

 

£201,660

Date of most recent PP Review

October 2018

Total number of students

 

548

Proportion of students eligible for PP = [number]/[number on roll] = 35.77%

Year 7:     50   41.67%   

Year 8:     55   46.61%    

Year 9:     35   30.17%      

Year 10:   28   28.00%    

Year 11:   28   29.79%      

Year 12:    

Year 13:   

Date for next internal review of this strategy

January 2019

Year 11 achievement targets

 

 

Disadvantaged students

Non-disadvantaged students

national average 2018

 

Progress 8

0.11

0.2

-0.02

 

Attainment 8

43.19

44.08

47.6

 

Basics 9-7

0

0

 

 

Basics 9-5

42.3%

39.7%

45%

 

Basic 9-4

69.2%

67.6%

66%

 

EBacc strong pass

19.2%

14.7%

 

 

EBacc standard pass

7.7%

7.4%

 

 

Academy attendance targets

 

 

Disadvantaged students

Non-disadvantaged students

national average 2018

 

Attendance

95.2%

95.2%

94.8%

 

Persistent absence

12%

12%

12.8%

 

                   

 

Year 11 Achievement Review (Jan 19)

 

Disadvantaged students

Non-disadvantaged students

Distance from national average 2018

Progress 8

-0.299

-0.114

 

Attainment 8

39.36

40.59

 

Basics 9-7

0

1.5%

 

Basics 9-5

29.6%

23.9%

 

Basic 9-4

51.9%

50.7%

 

EBacc strong pass

7.4%

3.0%

 

EBacc standard pass

7.4%

10.4%

 

Year 11 Achievement Review (Apr 19)

 

Disadvantaged students

Non-disadvantaged students

Distance from national average 2018

Progress 8

 

 

 

Attainment 8

 

 

 

Basics 9-7

 

 

 

Basics 9-5

 

 

 

Basic 9-4

 

 

 

EBacc strong pass

 

 

 

EBacc standard pass

 

 

 

July 2018 GCSE results (for benchmarking purposes)

 

Disadvantaged students

Non-disadvantaged students

All Pupils Nationally 2018

Progress 8

0.118

-0.022

-0.02

Attainment 8

38.94

37.62

47.6

Basics 9-7

9.1%

4.2%

 

Basics 9-5

18.2%

26.4%

45%

Basic 9-4

40.9%

50%

66%

EBacc strong pass

0

1.4%

 

EBacc standard pass

4.5%

5.6%

 

Attendance of disadvantaged students

 

Disadvantaged students

Non-disadvantaged students

All Pupils Nationally 2018

Attendance

92.41%

95.19%

94.8%

Persistent absence

26.3%

11.8%

12.8%

Achievement targets in other year groups

 

Disadvantaged students

Non-disadvantaged students

GAP

Year 7 % of students achieving 9-4

42.9%

53.8%

-10.9

Year 7 % of students achieving 9-5

12.5%

23.1%

-9.4

Year 8 % of students achieving 9-4

46.2%

58.9%

-12.7

Year 8 % of students achieving 9-5

15.4%

26.3%

-10.9

Year 9 % of students achieving 9-4

21.4%

61.6%

-40.2

Year 9 % of students achieving 9-5

10.7%

34.2%

-23.5

Year 10 % of students achieving 9-4

53.8%

50%

+3.8

Year 10 % of students achieving 9-5

26.9%

23.5%

+3.4

 

 

 

2.  

Disadvantaged students’ barriers to achievement

 

 In-school barriers (issues to be addressed at the academy)

 

A.  

 

Poor literacy levels on entry

 

B.  

 

Students on entry with moderate learning difficulties without the support required to make at least expected progress.

 

C.

Students demonstrating unacceptable and challenging behaviour causing disruption to learning.

 

D.

Matching a curriculum in a small school to the needs of individuals.

 

E.

Growing mental health issues having an impact on learning and the wellbeing of students.

 

External barriers (issues which also require action outside the academy, such as low attendance rates)

 

F.

Some students have minimal support at home for learning.

 

G.

Below average attendance for whole school in particular PP students.

 

H.

Ability to evidence providing impartial careers advice.

 

3.  

Desired outcomes

 

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

 

A.  

 

All students on to have literacy levels that allow full access to the curriculum by the end of year 8. All students to have reading age recorded at the end of year 8 and to re sit KS 2 English papers by the end of year 8.

All students to have a minimum reading age of 9.5 and to gain a minimum of 100 in the KS2 tests.

 

B.  

 

All students will have access to the support required to make at least expected progress. KPI checks to check progress being made.

All students regardless of need making at least expected progress in all subject areas.

 

C.  

 

All disruption to be eradicated from all lessons and where does exist is challenged logged and intervention put in place to reduce the amount of disruption. Termly inclusion report produced on number of logs.

Number of behaviour logs regarding disruption show a termly decrease.

 

D.  

 

Having a curriculum that is accessible for all pupils while maximising the EBAC entry and standard and strong passes.

75% of students to have an EBAC curriculum and the number of strong and standard passes to rise to 10% and 45%.

 

E.   

 

All students to have access to in school qualified counselling should it be required with a waiting list of not more than 3 weeks.

All students who are displaying mental health issues to have access to in school support and if required signposted to external agencies.

 

F.   

 

Access to supportive environments in school for homework to be completed. Identified parents accessing parenting support

All students to have as a minimum an environment where support for homework can be accessed, the uptake of which shows a decline as more homes become supportive environments.

 

G.  

 

Whole school attendance to be better than national average (94.8%, our target 95.2%) and Pas to be at least in line with national average. (Bromcom)

95.2% whole school attendance achieved and less than 12.8% PA.

 

H.  

 

To gain careers mark, allowing us to evidence the impartial advice given.

Careers mark awarded.

 



4.  

Planned expenditure

5.   

 

Academic year

2018/19

 

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they intend to use the pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

 

    i.  

Quality of teaching for all

   ii.  

 

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

COST

All disruption to be eradicated from all lessons and where does exist is challenged logged and intervention put in place to reduce the amount of disruption.

Termly rewards for students achieving behaviour, attendance and attitude to learning criteria Provide behaviour support for identified students through a key worker.

Early intervention for identified PP students.

 

Sutton trust moderate impact for moderate cost and an identified area of concern within the school SEF.

Monitoring of lessons and behaviour data along with weekly inclusion meetings involving all relevant staff.

ACA

weekly

3000

 

 

 

9,750

PP students to have access to all interventions that are required as identified by teaching staff.

Staff training identifying students and providing interventions

Help with transport and refreshment costs, to L6

Available access to ICT in class to support learning.

Targeted interventions within GCSE groups.

Increased learning resources to support homework and independent learning.

Peer tutoring

Introduce pupil progress leaders to identify students underperforming and coordinate interventions

Identified area of need

 

 

Sutton trust moderate impact moderate cost

Sutton trust Moderate impact for high cost

 

Sutton trust moderate impact for low cost

 

 

 

 

 

Sutton trust High impact low cost

Registers at all intervention sessions

 

Attendance at sessions

 

QA

 

SLT monitoring of interventions

 

 

 

 

 

Supervised tutoring

ACA

JAN 19

500

 

 

1000

 

 

1000

 

 

3000

 

 

 

500

10,000

All teaching to be graded at least good and 40% to be outstanding

Bespoke CPD sessions

Buzz markets

Robust QA

Teachers to offer individualised instruction for different learni9ng approaches.

Improved feedback and response to.

Improved teaching and learning will impact on outcomes for all.

 

 

 

 

 

Sutton trust high impact low cost

Calendared events

 

SLT scrutiny of QA

Learning walks and lesson oqbs

 

 

 

Work scrutiny

AP

JAN 19

500

Total budgeted cost

 

29,250




 iii.  

Targeted support

   iv.    

 

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

 

All students on to have literacy levels that allow full access to the curriculum by the end of year 8

Provide dyslexia support for those high numbers affected by dyslexia

 

Provide one additional Teaching Assistant to create extra support to pupils in our lower sets, where appropriate

 

 

Deliver RWI to low ability students through trained teaching assistants and assistant SENDCo

Sutton trust Moderate impact for high cost

But in area of great need.

 

 

Due to being in a grammar school area top 25% of students access a grammar provision so we are loaded with lower ability students. coupled with being oversubscribed class sizes are large and extra support required in lower sets

 

Identified area of need

Timetable

 

 

 

Line management

 

 

 

 

 

 

SLT monitoring

ACA

 

 

 

JSh

 

 

 

 

 

 

JSh

JAN 19

 

 

 

JAN 19

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAN 19

8,200

 

 

 

17,500

 

 

 

 

 

 

14,400

All students will have access to the support required to make at least expected progress

Increase provision for SEND students by adopting an assistant SENDCo who is non-teaching.

Provide dyslexia support for those high numbers affected by dyslexia

Identified area of need and barrier to progress. (no Sutton trust data)

Line management

SEND reviews

External reviews

 

 

 

Timetable

ACA

JAN 19

13,600

All students to have access to in school qualified counselling should it be required with a waiting list of not more than 3 weeks.

Provide counselling service in school daily from a MBACP counsellor.

Increased numbers of students presenting with emotional needs and mental health issues.

A mixture of areas of Sutton trust areas showing moderate impact for moderate cost.

Timetable

Number of re referrals

ACA

JAN 19

11,800

Evidence excellent impartial careers advice and guidance given, that is beneficial relevant and individual to all students

careers mark

Ofsted long criticised schools for patchy careers guidance and students with all the indicators that typically fall into PP students require that extra support and impartial guidance. No Sutton trust data

Careers mark awarded

MC

JAN 19

3,000

Total budgeted cost

 

68,500

                   


 

   v.  

Other approaches

 vi.  

 

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When to review implementation?

COST

Having a curriculum that is accessible for all pupils while maximising the EBAC entry and standard and strong passes.

Increase the amount of language opportunity and Opportunities in humanities.

The need for a well balanced curriculum to engage with all students and to provide students with the required outcomes for post 16 education. No Sutton trust data

Outcomes at KPI points and an increase in EBAC passes.

JMJ

JAN 19

72,000

Access to supportive environments in school for homework to be completed. Identified parents accessing parenting support

Provide revision books for PP students

Provide environment at social times and after school for support with homework completion.

Sutton trust moderate impact for low cost

Register of up take

CH

JAN 19

4000

Whole school attendance to be better than national average (94.8%, our target 95.2%) and PAs to be at least in line with national average

Adapt a full time attendance officer

Identified whole school issue and in particular for PP students

 No Sutton trust data.

Line management

Increase in attendance

Decrease in Pas

Increase in interventions

ACA

Weekly

9,200

Ensure all students have access to essential items

Provide uniform and hygiene essentials for the “sparkle club”

Sutton trust low impact for low cost, however the rationale is to reduce other barriers such as low self-esteem, bullying and social and emotional issues.

Student voice

ACA

JAN 19

5000

PP students to have equal access to all enrichment activities.

Support with transport

 

 

Creating fair access to music provision in guitar, percussions, brass, vocal and woodwind and associated examination costs

Sutton trust moderate impact for moderate cost.

Attendance of PP students in enrichment activities to increase.

ACA

JAN 19

10,000

 

 

 

 

3,600

Total budgeted cost

 

103,600

Total Proposed 2017/18 cost

 

Ongoing costs carried forward

 

Total

 

 

£201,550

 

 

 

 

£201,550



6.  

Review of expenditure

7.   

 

Previous Academic Year

2017/18

 

    i.  

Quality of teaching for all

   ii.  

 

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Evaluation

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing costs into 2018/19 -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                  

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                    

 

 iii.  

Targeted support

 iv.  

 

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Evaluation

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   v.  

Other approaches

 vi.  

 

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Evaluation

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                 

 

Measure

2016

A*-C

2017

9-1

2018

9-1

 

PP Students

Non PP students

PP Students

Non PP students

PP Students

Non PP students

Progress 8

-0.37

0.16

-0.08

0.14

0.118

-0.022

Attainment 8

34.56

47.45

36.92

38.19

38.94

37.62

Basic measure

43.8

81.8

31.6

43.6

40.9

50

Expected progress in English

87.5

90

33.3

37.8

57.1

59.1

Expected progress in maths.

50

94.7

33.3

16.2

36.4

44.3

 

·        

Progress 8 for PP students has steadily increased over the past 3 years and is now a positive figure, this has been in contrast to non PP students.

·        

Attainment 8 has shown an increase for PP students again in contrast to non PP students.

·        

The basics measure has increased for all students since the 9-1 grading, however the gap between PP and non PP has reduced.

·        

Progress in English and maths has improved for PP students since the introduction of 9-1 grading.